Tae Kwon Do for Adults and Children


Practical Self Defense for Adults

For adults of all ages. No prior martial arts experience required.
Taught by 8th Degree Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do, Henry Weber.
Learn:

  • techniques for getting out of difficult situations
  • effective self defense moves against one or more attackers
  • defense against weapons, as well as chokes, grabs and holds

Wednesday, September 11 – Wednesday October 23
6:35pm – 7:30pm


Fall Karate

Henry Weber, 8th Degree black belt, instructor

17 Sundays: September 15, 2019 – January 26, 2020

No Classes: 12/29, 1/19

Select the time below to sign up!
8:30-9:20amBeginner: White and Purple Belts
9:20-10:15amLower Intermediate:  Purple Belts
10:20-11:15amAdvanced Intermediate:  Red/Brown Belts
11:20am-12:20pmAdvanced:  Brown/Black Belts

17 Wednesdays:  September 11, 2019 – January 22, 2020

No classes: 10/9, 12/25, 1/1

Select the time below to sign up!
7:40-8:40pmBeginner/Intermediate
8:40-9:40pmAdvanced

2019-2020 Test Dates: Sunday, January 26 and Sunday, June 16


Spring Karate 2020

17 Sundays: February 2 – June 21, 2020

No Classes: 2/16, 4/19,5/24, 6/7

8:30-9:20amBeginner: White and Purple Belts
9:20-10:15amLower Intermediate:  Purple Belts
10:20-11:15amAdvanced Intermediate:  Red/Brown Belts
11:20am-12:20pmAdvanced:  Brown/Black Belts

17 Wednesdays:  February – June 2020

No classes:  2/19, 4/8, 4/15

7:40-8:40pmBeginner/Intermediate
8:40-9:40pmAdvanced

Any questions?  Contact Henry Weber, 8th Degree black belt, instructor


Tai Chi: Exercise, Meditation, Self-Defense

2019-2020 Season Starts Tuesday, September 3!

Tuesdays, 9:30am – 10:25am
Tuesdays, 7:15pm-8:10pm
Thursdays, 9:30am – 10:25am
Included for Health and Fitness Members or purchase a class here:

Tai Chi, pronounced “ti ji”, is a mind-body practice that originated in China as a martial art system.

The Form: This is the slow, meditative movements that one often associates with Tai Chi exercise practice. The form I teach is based on Cheng Man-Cheng’s (the highest level Tai Chi master ever to come to the US) short form of 60 moves. It can be performed by just about anyone and of any age.

The Three Basic Components of Tai Chi are:
Exercise: When performing the Tai Chi form, individuals sink their weight into the ground to maintain good body alignment to promote stability and balance. Movements flow from one to another, with body weight constantly shifting
from the right leg to left. Some movements are even named after animals or birds, such as “White Crane Spreads Its Wings.”

Meditation: Based on Taoist principles of “being in the flow,” the gentle and slow Tai Chi movements, individuals are able keep their mind calm and alert by concentrating on the moves and reaching a mindful, meditative state called “being
in the moment.”

Self-defense: With the steady flow of the form movements we exhale stale air and toxins from the lungs, stretch the muscles involved in breathing, and release body/mind tension. This gives one clarity of what’s happening around us so
we can identify threats to our well being, both mental and physical and deal with them in an efficient and effective manner.
Most people practice Tai Chi for various health purposes, such as:

  • As an isometric exercise it builds leg strength and promotes balance.
  • To improve physical condition, muscle strength, coordination and flexibility.
  • To lower the risk of falls and the resulting damage to the body.
  • To ease pain and stiffness–for example, from arthritis.
  • To reduce stress and related sicknesses.
  • To improve sleep.
  • To increase coordination and timing which is useful for various sports such as tennis and golf, among others.
  • For overall wellness as noted in many holistic journals.

The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai chi offers a testimonial to the benefits of this exercise. Tai Chi practice can offer one a healthy body, strong heart and sharp mind. Merging these makes Tai Chi the ideal exercise. No other discipline offers all that Tai Chi does for a healthy life style. Important note: Before practicing Tai Chi for health purposes, it is important that you seek advice from your main health
care provider, such as your family doctor of physical therapist.

For more information please call Arnold Breisblatt at (914) 776-5292